Events

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Events

There is always something happening in the School of Architecture & Environment. Join us for guest lectures, conferences, and research symposia. Most of these are free and open to the public. You can join our email list to receive our Upcoming Events weekly announcement and stay in the know about the latest happenings.

Oct 16
Kurt Culbertson—Surfacing Natural Systems: Toward an Ecology of the City5:00 p.m.

A continuum of landscape architecture and environmental theorists including Patrick Geddes, Ian McHarg, Michael Hough, Ann Spirn, and Charles Waldheim have sought to describe the...
October 16 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 115

A continuum of landscape architecture and environmental theorists including Patrick Geddes, Ian McHarg, Michael Hough, Ann Spirn, and Charles Waldheim have sought to describe the place of the natural environment within the urban context. Most recently the concept of landscape urbanism has entered the lexicon of the profession. Designers now speak of “constructed ecologies” and “green” infrastructure. But what is the basis for such constructions? Are these simply landscapes of the imagination are do they grow from an understanding of the deep structure of the natural environment? Can an understanding of marginal lands and racialized topography also provide an urban ecolog y that addresses issues of environmental justice? Inspired by such recent research as Eric Sanderson’s Manahatta and William Cronon’s Nature’s Metropolis, Culbertson will explore the juncture of history, planning, and landscape architecture as a basis for crafting an ecology of the city through the firm’s work in Detroit, St. Louis, and New Orleans.

A Victor Stanley Lecture Series event in collaboration with ASLA Oregon.

Lecture 6:00 p.m., reception 7:00 p.m.

Oct 18
2019 Reynolds Symposium: Education by Design5:00 p.m.

We are at a critical transition in architectural education—a transition that must propel schools to address the urgency of the multiple challenges facing our current...
October 18–19
White Stag Block, Room 141/142

We are at a critical transition in architectural education—a transition that must propel schools to address the urgency of the multiple challenges facing our current environment.

Join us in engaging this transition at the 2019 Reynolds Symposium: Education by Design, in Portland, Oregon, October 18–19, 2019. Faculty, practitioners, content experts, and students from 21 universities and 4 countries will present their inspiring, reflective, and effective lessons that represent a shift in the process from creating fossil-fuel-based communities, toward building environments that are healthy, resilient, and carbon-emissions free. AIA LU available.

The Symposium begins on Friday, October 18 at 5:15 p.m. with a keynote lecture, “From sustainability to resilience – preaching outside the choir” by architect Nina Maritz from Windhoek, Namibia. Please register with Eventbrite to attend the lecture.

October 19 begins with a keynote, “Redefining Design Excellence for a Climate Positive World” by architects Marsha Maytum, FAIA and Bill Leddy, FAIA, Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects (LSMA). We are proud to welcome back these principals of their award-winning firm that is dedicated to addressing issues of climate change and educational leadership.

A full day of parallel paper sessions and poster presentations on the following topics: 1) Design Integration; 2) Design with Climate; and 3) Digital Approaches. The day ends with an In-Practice Panel: How Did You Get There? This panel features the Oregon Zoo Education Center, a 2019 AIA COTE© Top Ten Award project and the design team, OPSIS Partner-in-charge, Alec Holser and Heather DeGrella, Senior Associate and other team members discussing their design approach and the top ten measurable impacts. The Symposium will end with a celebratory reception, sponsored by the Society of Building Science Educators.

Register via Eventbrite

Oct 21
Design For Spatial Justice Lecture Series5:15 p.m.

Land/Landed: Pryanka Bista and Zannah Matson, visiting faculty fellows in Design for Spatial Jusice Professor Bista is a Nepali-Canadian architect and designer working...
October 21 5:15 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Lawerence Hall, 206

Land/Landed:

Pryanka Bista and Zannah Matson, visiting faculty fellows in Design for Spatial Jusice

Professor Bista is a Nepali-Canadian architect and designer working at the intersection of public interest design and biodiversity conservation. She is the Co-Founder and Design Director of KTK-BELT studio working collaboratively with local communities to create the “Vertical University” project in Eastern Nepal spanning an 8,000-meter vertical gradient from Koshi-Tappu Wildlife Reserve (67 m.) to Mount Kanchenjunga (8,586 m.), the third tallest peak in the world. She has previously held the position of Senior Architect and Planner at Collaborative Media Advocacy Platform (CMAP), Nigeria, where she worked on the “Human City Project” employing participatory mapping, planning and design techniques in informal settlements of Port Harcourt.

Professor Matson’s research and design work focuses on the histories and contemporary reinterpretations of landscapes throughout processes of colonization, violence, and state infrastructure projects. Her current project focuses on a highway development project in Colombia’s eastern piedmont region in an investigation that brings together questions of landscape visuality, infrastructural promise, state-sponsored colonization, haunting violence, and extractivist economic motivations. Matson is a PhD Candidate in Human Geography at the University of Toronto and holds a Masters of Landscape Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design. In professional practice, Matson has worked with Public Work, MassLBP and OPSYS Landscape Infrastructure Lab, where she was the Project Manager and Exhibition Designer for the Canada Pavilion at the Venice 2016 Biennale Architettura. 

Oct 22
The Looming Cascadia Earthquake – What You Need to Know (at UO Portland) 4:00 p.m.

Featuring Dr. Lucy Jones (Caltech). Dr. Lucy Jones is the founder of the Dr. Lucy Jones Center for Science and Society, with a mission to foster the understanding and...
October 22 4:00 p.m.–5:30 p.m.
White Stag Block

Featuring Dr. Lucy Jones (Caltech).

Dr. Lucy Jones is the founder of the Dr. Lucy Jones Center for Science and Society, with a mission to foster the understanding and application of scientific information in the creation of more resilient communities. She is also a research associate at the Seismological Laboratory of Caltech. In 2016, she completed 33 years of federal service with the US Geological Survey. Most recently, she led the creation of a national science strategy for all the natural hazards studied by the USGS to promote the science that would better prepare the nation for future natural hazards. In her recent book The Big Ones: How Natural Disasters Have Shaped Us (and What We Can Do About Them), Dr. Jones offers both a look at how natural disasters have affected the course of history and how we can prepare for them.

Sponsored by the Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, UO Portland, and the School of Architecture & Environment.

Oct 24
Center for Art Research Exhibition Reception5:00 p.m.

Katherine Jenkins: Meadow Lines October 24 – November 15, 2019 Reception: Thursday, October 24 from 5-7pm  Gallery Hours: Friday- Saturday...
October 24 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
510 Oak

Katherine Jenkins: Meadow Lines

October 24 – November 15, 2019

Reception: Thursday, October 24 from 5-7pm 

Gallery Hours: Friday- Saturday 11:00am-4pm

Meadow Lines examines the connections between walking and drawing: the ways in which each delineates territory, modifies land and leaves traces. Jenkins practices walking as a form of drawing. She walks a landscape repeatedly, in various seasons and conditions, and records her movements via GPS. Upon returning to the studio Jenkins reconstructs the itinerary of each walk from its set of corresponding coordinates. Collected over time, the accretion of these digital threads form a mesh of overlapping lines and knots: a site plan of my movements through the landscape. This exhibition is made possible by the partnership of CFAR and the UO Slow Lab.

Katherine Jenkins is an assistant professor of landscape architecture at The Ohio State University and cofounder of the interdisciplinary design-research group, Present Practice. Her work expands the ways in which landscape architects engage with site and its material aesthetics. Her current project utilizes the inscription of walking as a design instrument for landscape architecture. Prior to joining OSU, Katherine taught in the Department of Landscape Architecture at Cornell University. She has an MLA from the University of Virginia and a BA in painting and printmaking from Yale University. 

Oct 25
Center for Art Research Exhibition11:00 a.m.

Katherine Jenkins: Meadow Lines October 24 – November 15, 2019 Gallery Hours: Friday- Saturday 11:00am-4pm Meadow Lines examines the connections...
October 25–November 15
510 Oak

Katherine Jenkins: Meadow Lines

October 24 – November 15, 2019

Gallery Hours: Friday- Saturday 11:00am-4pm

Meadow Lines examines the connections between walking and drawing: the ways in which each delineates territory, modifies land and leaves traces. Jenkins practices walking as a form of drawing. She walks a landscape repeatedly, in various seasons and conditions, and records her movements via GPS. Upon returning to the studio Jenkins reconstructs the itinerary of each walk from its set of corresponding coordinates. Collected over time, the accretion of these digital threads form a mesh of overlapping lines and knots: a site plan of my movements through the landscape. This exhibition is made possible by the partnership of CFAR and the UO Slow Lab.

Katherine Jenkins is an assistant professor of landscape architecture at The Ohio State University and cofounder of the interdisciplinary design-research group, Present Practice. Her work expands the ways in which landscape architects engage with site and its material aesthetics. Her current project utilizes the inscription of walking as a design instrument for landscape architecture. Prior to joining OSU, Katherine taught in the Department of Landscape Architecture at Cornell University. She has an MLA from the University of Virginia and a BA in painting and printmaking from Yale University.

Oct 28
Design For Spatial Justice Lecture Series5:15 p.m.

House/Housed Karen Kubey and Menna Agha, Visiting Faculty Fellows in Design for Spatial Justice: Professor Kubey is an urbanist specializing in housing and health. She is...
October 28 5:15 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, 206

House/Housed

Karen Kubey and Menna Agha, Visiting Faculty Fellows in Design for Spatial Justice:

Professor Kubey is an urbanist specializing in housing and health. She is the editor of the book Housing as Intervention: Architecture towards Social Equity (Architectural Design, 2018). Kubey co-founded the New York chapter of Architecture for Humanity (now Open Architecture/New York) and co-founded and led the New Housing New York design competition. Kubey was the curator of “Low Rise High Density,” an exhibition and program series at the Center for Architecture in New York on the legacies and potential futures of low-rise, high-density housing. She is a recipient of the Wilder Green Fellowship at the MacDowell Colony and an International Social Economic Environmental Design (SEED) Award.

Professor Agha investigates concepts of public space, the emotional in the built environment, and territoriality of the landless. She focuses on the idea of “active marginality,” and is occupied with questions such as; how to build for, from, like, and within the margin. Agha believes that the critical issue of marginality should be prominent in architecture studio, not only in academic research. Agha is a third-generation displaced Nubian; her inquiry is rooted in a personal and generational experience of spatial injustice. Her research on Nubian displacement has been published in “The Non-work of the Unimportant” and in “Liminal Publics, Marginal Resistance: Learning from Nubian Spaces.”

Oct 30
Architecture in Vicenza: Info Session 25:00 p.m.

Gain a valuable perspective on Italy’s contribution to architectural, urban, and landscape design through the ages. The program begins in Rome with a two-week study tour...
October 30 5:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, 206

Gain a valuable perspective on Italy’s contribution to architectural, urban, and landscape design through the ages. The program begins in Rome with a two-week study tour that includes Siena, Florence and Bologna before taking up residence for eight weeks in Vicenza, where the focus will be on the design studio. Traveling and then living in an Italian town will give you a rich cultural experience, enhanced by coursework that will contribute to your academic progress toward your degree.

Program Dates:

Spring Quarter - Early April to Mid-June

Application Deadlines:

Priority - October 15 (receive $100 program discount)

Final - November 15

Find out more or APPLY TODAY:

https://geo.uoregon.edu/programs/italy/architecture-in-vicenza

Nov 4
Design For Spatial Justice Lecture Series5:15 p.m.

Place/Placed: Chris Cornelius (studio:indigenous) and Garrick Imatani (Pacific Northwest College of Art) Professor Cornelius, an enrolled member of the Oneida Nation of...
November 4 5:15 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, 206

Place/Placed:

Chris Cornelius (studio:indigenous) and Garrick Imatani (Pacific Northwest College of Art)

Professor Cornelius, an enrolled member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, focuses his research and practice on the architectural translation of culture; in particular, American Indian culture. He is the founding principal of studio:indigenous, a design and consulting practice serving American Indian clients and an associate professor in the Department of Architecture at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Garrick Imatani is an artist who uses embodied perception, fabrication, and performance to think through the role of landscape, collective history, and racialized bodies within the United States. Imatani’s process frequently stems from research, site visits and collaboration, resulting in sculptures, installations, drawings, photographs, videos, and public projects exhibited nationally and internationally. Imatani, associate professor and chair of the Foundation program at Pacific Northwest College of Art, recently completed a commissioned public art project for the University of Oregon’s Straub Hall.

Dec 9
Suicide Prevention Training and Resources9:00 a.m.

The Suicide Prevention Team and the University Counseling Center (UCC) offers this workshop for faculty, staff, and GEs. Partcipant learning objectives are to: 1. Develop...
December 9 9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m.
TBA

The Suicide Prevention Team and the University Counseling Center (UCC) offers this workshop for faculty, staff, and GEs. Partcipant learning objectives are to:

1. Develop skills in identifying and responding to students who may have thoughts of suicide. 

2.  Develop skills in how to engage students in a conversation about your concern and ways to seek help.

3. Develop knowledge of campus and community resources and how to make an appropriate referral.

If a department would like to schedule a suicide prevention workshop, please submit a request form here. 

The Faculty & Staff section of the UCC website includes several additional online resources for helping students in distress.

The Student Suicide Prevention Team also offers a peer-to-peer workshop for students. Request a student workshop here. 

If you are thinking about suicide, call the UCC After-Hours Support and Crisis Line at 541-346-3227 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK (8255) now. Or text 'OREGON' to 741-741.

All Upcoming Events