Department of Landscape Architecture Events

Oct 23
William L. Allen III, The Conservation Fund9:00 a.m.

Protecting More with Less: Ecological Places in Cities William L. Allen III, Vice President, Conservation Services, The Conservation Fund Will currently oversees the...
October 23 9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 231

Protecting More with Less: Ecological Places in Cities

William L. Allen III, Vice President, Conservation Services, The Conservation Fund

Will currently oversees the Fund’s Conservation Services which are organized around four business lines: the Freshwater Institute, Resourceful Communities, Strategic Conservation, and the Conservation Leadership Network. Will also coordinates organization-wide integrated services across the Fund’s business units and directs Strategic Conservation Planning services in Chapel Hill, NC. 

Will manages the Fund’s design and delivery of integrated solutions and customized planning services, including green infrastructure plans, strategic mitigation, ecosystem service and optimization models, data-driven decision support maps and tools, and tactical conservation guidance. Will and his team support a wide range of initiatives including multi-species habitat conservation plans, metropolitan greenspace networks, and reuse of urban vacant and underutilized lands. Will and his team have received planning and mapping awards from the American Planning Association, the American Society of Landscape Architects, and Esri, Inc. 

Will also has served as an instructor for green infrastructure seminars and courses, publishes peer reviewed journal and trade publication articles, and served as co-editor-in-chief and managing editor of the Journal of Conservation Planning from 2005-2017. Will is a member of the American Planning Association and co-founder of the Society for Conservation GIS. Will holds a B.A. in Urban Studies from Stanford University and a Masters in Regional Planning from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. 

 

Oct 24
Center for Art Research Exhibition Reception5:00 p.m.

Katherine Jenkins: Meadow Lines October 24 – November 15, 2019 Reception: Thursday, October 24 from 5:00-7:00pm  Gallery Hours: Friday- Saturday...
October 24 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m.
510 Oak

Katherine Jenkins: Meadow Lines

October 24 – November 15, 2019

Reception: Thursday, October 24 from 5:00-7:00pm 

Gallery Hours: Friday- Saturday 11:00am-4:00pm

Meadow Lines examines the connections between walking and drawing: the ways in which each delineates territory, modifies land and leaves traces. Jenkins practices walking as a form of drawing. She walks a landscape repeatedly, in various seasons and conditions, and records her movements via GPS. Upon returning to the studio Jenkins reconstructs the itinerary of each walk from its set of corresponding coordinates. Collected over time, the accretion of these digital threads form a mesh of overlapping lines and knots: a site plan of my movements through the landscape. This exhibition is made possible by the partnership of CFAR and the UO Slow Lab.

Katherine Jenkins is an assistant professor of landscape architecture at The Ohio State University and cofounder of the interdisciplinary design-research group, Present Practice. Her work expands the ways in which landscape architects engage with site and its material aesthetics. Her current project utilizes the inscription of walking as a design instrument for landscape architecture. Prior to joining OSU, Katherine taught in the Department of Landscape Architecture at Cornell University. She has an MLA from the University of Virginia and a BA in painting and printmaking from Yale University. 

Oct 25
Center for Art Research Exhibition11:00 a.m.

Katherine Jenkins: Meadow Lines October 24–November 15, 2019 Gallery Hours: Friday–Saturday, 11:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. Meadow Lines examines...
October 25–November 15
510 Oak

Katherine Jenkins: Meadow Lines

October 24–November 15, 2019

Gallery Hours: Friday–Saturday, 11:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Meadow Lines examines the connections between walking and drawing: the ways in which each delineates territory, modifies land and leaves traces. Jenkins practices walking as a form of drawing. She walks a landscape repeatedly, in various seasons and conditions, and records her movements via GPS. Upon returning to the studio Jenkins reconstructs the itinerary of each walk from its set of corresponding coordinates. Collected over time, the accretion of these digital threads form a mesh of overlapping lines and knots: a site plan of my movements through the landscape. This exhibition is made possible by the partnership of CFAR and the UO Slow Lab.

Katherine Jenkins is an assistant professor of landscape architecture at The Ohio State University and cofounder of the interdisciplinary design-research group, Present Practice. Her work expands the ways in which landscape architects engage with site and its material aesthetics. Her current project utilizes the inscription of walking as a design instrument for landscape architecture. Prior to joining OSU, Katherine taught in the Department of Landscape Architecture at Cornell University. She has an MLA from the University of Virginia and a BA in painting and printmaking from Yale University.

Oct 28
Design For Spatial Justice Lecture Series5:15 p.m.

"House/Housed" Karen Kubey and Menna Agha, Visiting Faculty Fellows in Design for Spatial Justice Professor Kubey is an urbanist specializing in housing and...
October 28 5:15 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 206

"House/Housed"

Karen Kubey and Menna Agha, Visiting Faculty Fellows in Design for Spatial Justice

Professor Kubey is an urbanist specializing in housing and health. She is the editor of the book Housing as Intervention: Architecture towards Social Equity (Architectural Design, 2018). Kubey co-founded the New York chapter of Architecture for Humanity (now Open Architecture/New York) and co-founded and led the New Housing New York design competition. Kubey was the curator of “Low Rise High Density,” an exhibition and program series at the Center for Architecture in New York on the legacies and potential futures of low-rise, high-density housing. She is a recipient of the Wilder Green Fellowship at the MacDowell Colony and an International Social Economic Environmental Design (SEED) Award.

Professor Agha investigates concepts of public space, the emotional in the built environment, and territoriality of the landless. She focuses on the idea of “active marginality,” and is occupied with questions such as; how to build for, from, like, and within the margin. Agha believes that the critical issue of marginality should be prominent in architecture studio, not only in academic research. Agha is a third-generation displaced Nubian; her inquiry is rooted in a personal and generational experience of spatial injustice. Her research on Nubian displacement has been published in “The Non-work of the Unimportant” and in “Liminal Publics, Marginal Resistance: Learning from Nubian Spaces.”

Nov 4
Design For Spatial Justice Lecture Series5:15 p.m.

"Place/Placed" Chris Cornelius (studio:indigenous) and Garrick Imatani (Pacific Northwest College of Art) Professor Cornelius, an enrolled member of the Oneida...
November 4 5:15 p.m.–6:30 p.m.
Lawrence Hall, Room 206

"Place/Placed"

Chris Cornelius (studio:indigenous) and Garrick Imatani (Pacific Northwest College of Art)

Professor Cornelius, an enrolled member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin, focuses his research and practice on the architectural translation of culture; in particular, American Indian culture. He is the founding principal of studio:indigenous, a design and consulting practice serving American Indian clients and an associate professor in the Department of Architecture at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Garrick Imatani is an artist who uses embodied perception, fabrication, and performance to think through the role of landscape, collective history, and racialized bodies within the United States. Imatani’s process frequently stems from research, site visits and collaboration, resulting in sculptures, installations, drawings, photographs, videos, and public projects exhibited nationally and internationally. Imatani, associate professor and chair of the Foundation program at Pacific Northwest College of Art, recently completed a commissioned public art project for the University of Oregon’s Straub Hall.

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