Department of Architecture Events

 

Feb 14
MIX, MIX, MAX, MIN by Sheila Kennedy of KVA Matx 4:45 p.m.

MIX, MIX, MAX, MIN   This lecture by Sheila Kennedy, FAIA presents the recent work of KVA Matx, an interdisciplinary design practice that is recognized for research on...
MIX, MIX, MAX, MIN by Sheila Kennedy of KVA Matx
February 14
4:45 p.m.
This is a virtual event.

MIX, MIX, MAX, MIN

 

This lecture by Sheila Kennedy, FAIA presents the recent work of KVA Matx, an interdisciplinary design practice that is recognized for research on material culture, innovation in architecture and the design of soft, resilient forms of infrastructure.  Building materials are not only scarce resources, they are also unstable. Their properties transform over time from one condition to another, putting material categories into question. Unlike the modernist aesthetic that celebrated technology, the present moment is distinguished by the elusive, dormant condition of infrastructure that sleeps within materials.

 

In this talk, Kennedy will present her recent built work at KVA Matx and reflect on unfamiliar, sleeping forms of material beauty that may, perhaps, need only a kiss to be awakened. Kennedy will discuss projects that engage natural flax, sheep’s wool, baling wire, phase change materials, hard wood thinnings, cross laminated timber, textiles, gravity, nano-particles and trees.  These projects demonstrate design strategies that transform the conventions of material culture in architecture and offer alternatives to high-energy construction and manufacturing practices. These strategies include the mixing of digital and traditional fabrication techniques and modes of project delivery, new partnerships with living plants and the hybridization of ancient and contemporary materials. Through the minimization of materiality in architecture and the maximization of material and spatial effects, the lecture is intended to encourage architects to question material ‘givens’ and create new aesthetics and forms of environmental agency that are practicable, impactful and scalable.

 

Monday, Feb 14, 4:45pm

Eugene, Lawrence 115 & Zoom

Feb 16
Occupant Well-being and the Built Environment 5:30 p.m.

Lecture Description Dr. Flavia Grey and Vidhya Rajendran from ZGF Architects’ Data Strategy and Research team will discuss the latest knowledge and strategies to design,...
Occupant Well-being and the Built Environment
February 16
5:30 p.m.
This is a virtual event.

Lecture Description

Dr. Flavia Grey and Vidhya Rajendran from ZGF Architects’ Data Strategy and Research team will discuss the latest knowledge and strategies to design, build, and operate healthy and sustainable buildings.  They will introduce how the built environment impacts occupant health and well-being and share human-centered design best practices as applied to some case studies from their work.

 

Flavia Grey

Flavia partners with clients and project teams to incorporate data-driven decision-making into all phases of design, from concept development to construction administration and beyond. Flavia taps into new and existing streams of data to inform and objectively assess the efficacy of ZGF’s work to provide the healthiest, most productive spaces for end users. She strengthens the firm’s designs with occupancy evaluations, space utilization studies, and other project-specific and firmwide research initiatives, and also gathers, organizes, and mines data to make informed design decisions. Since 2017, Flavia has hosted the popular U.S. Green Building Council podcast “Built for Health,” in which she interviews public health professionals, researchers, and building-industry practitioners about designing, building, and operating healthier buildings.

 

Vidhya Rajendran

Vidhya Rajendran is an architect and sustainability data analyst at ZGF Architects. She is a recent graduate from the Master of Science in Architecture program from the University of Washington, Seattle. She specializes in computational design, sustainability, and data management

Feb 18
Recent Housing Work- Ben Waechter noon

Recent Housing Work Ben Waechter Waechter Architecture Friday, Feb 18 Noon-1:00pm Zoom & livestreaming in Portland in WSB 555   Inspired by...
Recent Housing Work- Ben Waechter
February 18
noon
White Stag Block WSB 555

Recent Housing Work

Ben Waechter

Waechter Architecture

Friday, Feb 18

Noon-1:00pm

Zoom & livestreaming in Portland in WSB 555

 

Inspired by experiential and clear, distilled design, Ben founded Waechter Architecture (WA) in order to pursue these concepts in his work. Prior to forming WA, he worked locally and internationally with leaders in architecture including Allied Works Architecture (Portland, OR) and world-renowned architect Renzo Piano (Genoa, Italy). Ben is an award-winning and published designer whose principles lie in providing bold forms arrived at through exercises in concept, distillation, and intelligent programming. His experience includes a wide range of building types: cultural, hospitality, commercial, and multi-family and single-family residential.

Mar 30
Adaptive Refugee Housing: Global Perspectives 5:30 p.m.

How can built environment professionals prepare for this era of forcible displacement? Resource scarcity, natural disasters and armed conflicts are driving forced migration...
Adaptive Refugee Housing: Global Perspectives
March 30
5:30–7:30 p.m.
Lawrence Hall 115

How can built environment professionals prepare for this era of forcible displacement?

Resource scarcity, natural disasters and armed conflicts are driving forced migration levels well above historical levels, with the number of forcibly displaced people estimated to be over 84 million according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. As the need for housing can be sudden and acute, architects, planners and other environmental designers must be equipped to quickly provide humane and agile responses.

This session assembles a global panel of faculty and practitioners concerned with the needs of refugees to speculate about this question and gather audience input in attempting to address it. They will humanize this growing challenge through video snapshots and personal stories connecting to migration. They will explain guidelines such as trauma-informed design and exemplars of empowering building collaborations, along with the many variables shaping the refugee experience that make general principles subordinate to situated approaches for generating housing solutions. Finally, the session will provide resources for further information and action.

Featuring

Nancy Cheng, UO Architecture (moderator) Grace Aaraj, Archi-build LLC John Arroyo, UO Planning, Policy and Public Management Joachim Kieferle, Hochschule RheinMain Earl Mark, University of Virginia Kory Russel, UO Landscape Architecture and Environmental Studies Marziah Zad, Instituto de Arquitectura Avanzada de Cataluña

This event is part of the Global Justice Program with funds provided by Savage Endowment for International Relations and Peace.

Apr 8
The Black Aesthetic 4:00 p.m.

Robert Clarke, the Visiting Faculty Fellow in Design for Spatial Justice at the School of Architecture and Environment, aims to unearth new expressions and aesthetics in...
The Black Aesthetic
April 8
4:00 p.m.

Robert Clarke, the Visiting Faculty Fellow in Design for Spatial Justice at the School of Architecture and Environment, aims to unearth new expressions and aesthetics in architecture that are derived from the Black American experience in his upcoming lecture, The Black Aesthetic.

Throughout the history of the world, many cultures have manifested their own architecture that is specific to their customs and traditions. However, this cultural phenomenon has not manifested itself in the Black American community, in terms of a recognizable architectural style. His work aims to speculate how can one correct this cultural and artistic omission within the discourse of architecture.

The projects displayed within this compilation of works will explore novel methodologies that investigate how one can interject black culture into architectural forms and motifs.

How can we unearth a recognizable aesthetic that expresses lost histories, current histories, and cultural norms that is specific to African American culture. 

You can attend this event in person in Lawrence Hall in LA 115 or on Zoom with the following link https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/99512025512.

Apr 18
Architecture Lecture Series: "Wellness Design Evaluation Tools and Implication on Indoor Environment" 5:30 p.m.

Wellness Design Evaluation Tools and Implication on Indoor Environment Lecture Description Systematic review identifies interior design elements to enhance user's...
Architecture Lecture Series: "Wellness Design Evaluation Tools and Implication on Indoor Environment"
April 18
5:30–7:00 p.m.

Wellness Design Evaluation Tools and Implication on Indoor Environment

Lecture Description

Systematic review identifies interior design elements to enhance user's wellness. Empirical research discovers its criteria based on a user survey and creates an evaluation tool that helps users' wellness experience in the various settings (health care lobby and workplace).

Speakers

Yongyeon Cho, NCIDQ, LEED GA, WELL AP, is currently an assistant professor in the Interior Design Department and a faculty member in the Human-Computer Interaction Program at Iowa State University. He holds a MFA degree from Iowa State University. Since 2018, he has worked as an interior design consultant at Keumkang Enterprises Inc, in Seoul, Korea. In 2017, he was an interior design professional at HOK, Chicago office. He was a member of a student-winning team for the Healthcare Environment Award, sponsored by Contract magazine and The Center for Healthcare Design (2016). He is a recipient of two awards at ASAI (2015, 2019), the AAHID graduate research fellowship (2017), and the winner of Next Work Environment Competition organized by Work Design Magazine in 2020. His research interests include wellness design research and method, evaluation criteria and assessment tools, graphic communication tools and techniques, and user-centered design.

Huiwon Lim joined the Penn State graphic design faculty in August 2019 as an assistant professor. He previously served as a lecturer at Iowa State University, which is where he earned his MFA in Graphic Design, a graduate certificate in human-computer interaction, and an MA in Environmental Graphic Design. His interests lie in visual communications, environmental graphic design, brand experience, human-computer interaction, user experience design, visualizing information, and exhibition design.

This will be presented with a livestream. Join us in LA 206.

https://uoregon.zoom.us/j/93449950576.

Apr 29
'A Street in A City' with Katherine Darnstadt 4:00 p.m.

Katherine Darnstadt  Latent Design, Chicago A Street in A City Katherine Darnstadt is the founder of Latent Design, a progressive architecture and urbanism firm...
'A Street in A City' with Katherine Darnstadt
April 29
4:00 p.m.

Katherine Darnstadt 

Latent Design, Chicago

A Street in A City

Katherine Darnstadt is the founder of Latent Design, a progressive architecture and urbanism firm leveraging civic innovation and social impact to design more equitable spaces and systems. Since founding her practice in 2010, Darnstadt and her firm have prototyped new urban design systems to advance urban agriculture, support small business through Boombox, created spaces for youth makers, advanced building innovation though Blank Box, and created public space frameworks through Design Trust Chicago.  She and the firm have been published, exhibited and featured widely, most notably at the International Venice Architecture Biennial, Architizer A+ Awards, Chicago Ideas Week, NPR, American Institute of Architects Young Architects Honor Award winner, and Crain’s Chicago 40 Under 40. She previously taught at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Northwestern University.

In Eugene LA 115 and on Zoom for the presentation.

May 9
Memorial Landscapes and the Expanded Field- Robyn Reed 4:00 p.m.

Title: Memorial Landscapes and the Expanded Field    Description: One of the many impacts of George Floyd’s murder was to renew public debate on the...
Memorial Landscapes and the Expanded Field- Robyn Reed
May 9
4:00–5:30 p.m.

Title:

Memorial Landscapes and the Expanded Field 

 

Description:

One of the many impacts of George Floyd’s murder was to renew public debate on the role of monuments and representation as part of a larger national conversation about race and representation. And with more than one million people in the US lost to Covid-19, this is a time to examine whom we choose to honor and how we do so. As designers, how do we translate lived experiences in ways that embrace complexity and diversity? And what role does landscape play in the storytelling? Part case-study, part provocation, this lecture centers on the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama, and other recent examples to suggest how landscape might better engage these complicated narratives to create richer and more inclusive designs. 

 

Robyn's bio:

Robyn Reed is a designer, educator, and advocate for the practice of landscape architecture. A graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, Robyn is a licensed landscape architect who joined the Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture at LSU after more than 20 years in practice. An Assistant Professor, Robyn teaches graduate and undergraduate design studios, drawing, and advanced seminars. Prior to joining the LSU faculty, Robyn taught for many years as adjunct faculty at RISD. Her research interests emerged from her years in design practice, focusing on dampness as in-between urban conditions of water. More recently, Robyn has focused on the role of narrative in memorial landscapes, its place in the “expanded field,” and how the profession might better engage the hidden human histories embedded in our landscapes. 

 

May 11
DESIGN EARTH: lecture by Rania Ghosn 5:30 p.m.

On behalf of the Department of Architecture lecture committee and the UO Environment Initiative: Please join us on Wednesday, May 11th at 5:30pm on Zoom for the...
DESIGN EARTH: lecture by Rania Ghosn
May 11
5:30–7:00 p.m.
This is a virtual event.

On behalf of the Department of Architecture lecture committee and the UO Environment Initiative:

Please join us on Wednesday, May 11th at 5:30pm on Zoom for the presentation:

Rania Ghosn

DESIGN EARTH

Geostories

In Geostories: Another Architecture for the Environment, DESIGN EARTH makes visible the anthropogenic worlds of climate change in a series of 14 projects, in which the architectural drawing and narrative are critical of and speculative of planetary futures. The talk is organized into three sections—terrarium, aquarium, and planetarium—in reference both to the domains of the earth and its representations. I will present one project from each section. The projects “After Oil,” “Pacific Aquarium,” and “Cosmorama” present spaces of environmental externalities, such as oil extraction sites, ocean acidification and deep-sea mining, air pollution, space debris.  The talk foregrounds such sites as the matter of concern for a renewed civic design of the Earth.

Rania Ghosn is Associate Professor of architecture and urbanism at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and founding partner with El Hadi Jazairy of DESIGN EARTH. Her design research practice employs the speculative architecture project as a medium to make visible and public the climate crisis. Her work has been widely published and exhibited internationally, recently at Venice Biennial, Bauhaus Museum Dessau, SFMOMA and Matadero Madrid, and is in the New York Museum of Modern Art permanent collection. Ghosn is recipient of the United States Artist Fellowship, Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers, Boghossian Foundation Prize, and ACSA Faculty Design Awards ACSA for outstanding work in architecture and related environmental design fields as a critical endeavor. Her books include Geostories: Another Architecture for the Environment (3rd ed. 2022; 2018), Geographies of Trash, 2015, and The Planet After Geoengineering (2021), the edited volume New Geographies 2: Landscapes of Energy. Ghosn holds a Bachelor of Architecture from American University of Beirut, a Master of Geography from University College London, and a Doctor of Design from the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

May 17
On Spatial [In]justice: An Interdisciplinary Exchange 5:00 p.m.

Title On Spatial [In]justice: An Interdisciplinary Exchange   Description Spatial justice remains a relatively new concept - borne out of inquiries into the...
On Spatial [In]justice: An Interdisciplinary Exchange
May 17
5:00–7:30 p.m.
Lawrence Hall 115 and 206

Title

On Spatial [In]justice: An Interdisciplinary Exchange

 

Description

Spatial justice remains a relatively new concept - borne out of inquiries into the relationship between the social and the spatial, and, more specifically, between social justice and space. A number of critical theorists, activists, and practitioners have developed work in this area, among them, the political geographer and an urban theorist Edward Soja [1940-2015], who described spatial [in]justice as both an outcome and a process that involves the [un]fair and [in]equitable distribution of socially valued resources in space as well as the opportunity, or lack thereof, to access them. While it may be relatively simpler to recognize the many instances and results of spatial [in]justice, it is far more complex to comprehend the underpinning processes that produce specific forms of spatial [in]justice.

 

This in-person symposium, organized and hosted by the School of Architecture & Environment as part of its Design for Spatial Justice Initiative, will explore conceptions and practices of spatial [in]justice by inviting voices and synthesizing knowledge from multiple disciplines, thereby creating an exchange across and beyond disciplinary boundaries. It seeks to gather faculty and students across the University of Oregon under one roof, and welcomes community participation. It will feature short inputs by ten speakers (Session ONE) from diverse disciplinary and research backgrounds, and also include roundtable discussions (Session TWO) led by the School of Architecture & Environment’s current cohort of Design for Spatial Justice Fellows and advocates of the Design for Spatial Justice Initiative.

 

Date & Time

Tuesday, May 17, 05:00 - 07:30 pm (PT)

 

Venues

LA 115 (05:00 - 06:30 pm) for Opening Notes + Session ONE (Speaker Presentations)

LA 206 (06:30 - 07:30 pm) for Session TWO (Roundtable Conversations)

Note for Students

While Session ONE does not require registration, participation in Session TWO is by registration only. The second session will provide you with an opportunity to interact with our distinguished speakers and to share your questions and perspectives on the benefits of interdisciplinary thinking and collaborations in identifying and addressing the many forms of injustice that become evident in and through space, and on whether we are doing enough to build these collaborations in art, design and architecture education and practice. With up to 40 places available, students are requested to contact Sami Chohan (schohan@uoregon.edu) for securing participation in Session TWO.    

 

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